Live Real. Eat Real.

The Only Hope For Mankind

No, this isn’t hyperbole, and I’ll tell – or rather, show – you why in just a moment.  But first:

It’s no secret that I eat meat; some might suggest I eat far too much of it.  It’s no secret that I’ve bettered and even eliminated a great many health problems by eating meat that has been raised in keeping with its biology and by curtailing or eliminating my consumption of certain non-animal foods.  I’ve made no secret of the fact that I believe monocrop agriculture has done far more to harm our environment than the proper raising of food animals.

I don’t get much argument on that last point here; I don’t know if it’s because the vast majority of the people who come here are just looking for a good recipe and don’t want to get caught up in a debate about how the food they’ll be cooking came to be, or if it’s because most of my regular readers agree with me, or if it’s because those who don’t necessarily agree are being respectful of my opinion.  It’s likely all three.

My Facebook page is a different matter, probably because I actively promote it and there are a LOT of people on Facebook.  But whatever the reason, I get a fair amount of nasty comments on my recipe posts – particularly those that feature meat (with a nice, big, color photograph).  A couple have been about the quality of my photography (I’ll be the first to admit I am no professional), but most have been about, well, the meat.  For some reason, vegans have this driving need to tell me that my recipes, especially the photos, gross them out.

(My favorite comment so far was on yesterday’s venison post – which has gotten more likes, and more derogatory comments, than any to date – “I just threw up in my mouth.”  Since I try very hard not to feed the trolls, I refrained from suggesting that some nice, rare venison might solve that digestive issue.  But I digress.)

Vegans have many reasons for being vegan, and one that is almost universal among them is that livestock A) is one of the major causes of “climate change” and 2) will never be able to feed our rapidly growing numbers worldwide.

The video below is a TED lecture given by Allan Savory, a biologist and environmentalist who used to agree.  He has since come to believe – no, prove – that this is absolutely incorrect.  His lecture runs 22 minutes, but it is so fascinating you’ll never be aware of the time that’s gone by.  I won’t go over everything he says, but the title of this post is a direct quote from the lecture:  the holistic management of large numbers of livestock is the only hope for mankind.  It’s the only way we’ll reverse global warming and the only way we’ll be able to feed the 10 billion people that will populate this earth in just a few short years.

Plant-based diets aren’t the answer.  You can not deny the science.

Fight Back Friday

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