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Pot Roast In Foil

Well, we’ve gotten to the point with our latest side of beef where we’ve eaten most of the interesting and/or tasty bits (oxtail, short ribs, flank steak, flat iron steak, skirt steak, hanger steak, tri-tip, etc.) and are left with a lot of roasts, especially since I don’t have any of it cut into stew meat – I tend to do that myself. (Which reminds me…beef stew might be pretty darn good this weekend…)

Not too long ago, I posted a recipe for Slow Cooker Pot Roast, which is very, very good.  Not everyone likes how food prepared in a slow cooker tastes, though, or they have issues with the consistency, or they may simply not have one, especially if space is an issue.  And some people may just prefer a roast prepared in the oven; there’s certainly nothing wrong with that.

If you have a truly good cut of meat – say a prime rib or a whole tenderloin – roasting it using the method for my Perfect Prime Rib will get you excellent results every time.  But what if you have a lesser cut – a good rump roast, or chuck-eye – that, while certainly not as tender as a prime rib or tenderloin, works well roasted, rather than braised?  These cuts are very flavorful, but you run the risk of them drying out if you’re not careful.  So what do you do?

You cook it in foil, that’s what you do.  And it will turn out great.  Not melt-in-your mouth tender, but wonderfully flavorful – just what a good pot roast should be.

When I asked on Facebook if anyone was interested in the Slow Cooker Pot Roast, one of my readers commented that she was, especially since she knew it wouldn’t include a packet of onion soup mix.  I look back on those roasts made with the packet of onion soup mix rather fondly, even if I wouldn’t touch it with a ten-foot pole now, and the seasoning rub on this roast, along with the tamari, does a marvelous job of mimicking the flavors of that little packet of chemicals.  It was just delicious.

You can add potatoes, if you like, to the vegetables in the foil packet although I served ours with a baked white potato for The Young One and a baked Japanese sweet for myself.  We devoured half of this at dinner; I chopped up the rest, mixed it with some Maple Barbecue Sauce and served it later in the week over more baked potatoes.  Yum!

Pot Roast In Foil - a classic family favorite (without the soup mix!)

5.0 from 2 reviews
Pot Roast In Foil
 
Serves: 4
Ingredients
Rub:
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon tapioca flour
  • 2 teaspoons onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon coconut sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1/4 teaspoon celery seed
Roast:
  • 2 pound boneless rolled rump or chuck-eye roast
  • 1 small onion, roughly chopped
  • 2 cups baby carrots
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 tablespoons tamari or gluten-free soy sauce, divided
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 325 F. Combine rub ingredients in small bowl.
  2. Pat the roast dry and remove the twine "netting" with scissors, if necessary. Rub the entire surface with the seasoning mixture and set aside.
  3. Line a roasting pan or Dutch oven with heavy-duty aluminum foil. Place onion, carrots, and bay leaves in center of foil and drizzle with 1 tablespoon tamari. Set the roast on top of the vegetables and drizzle with the remaining tablespoon of tamari.
  4. Fold the aluminum foil over the top of the roast and crimp the edges tightly to seal. Transfer pan to oven and cook for 1 1/2 hours, or until the internal temperature of the roast reaches 135 F on an instant read thermometer.
  5. Allow the roast to rest 20 minutes. Remove the roast from the foil pouch and discard the bay leaves. Using a slotted spoon, place the vegetables on a serving platter; keep warm. Slice the roast thinly against grain and transfer to the platter with the vegetables. Serve with the pan juices.
  6. Nutrition (per serving): 332 calories, 7.4g total fat, 145.2mg cholesterol, 1182mg sodium, 1074.4mg potassium, 13.8g carbohydrates, 3.3g fiber, 5.5g sugar, 49.9g protein


7 comments

Oooooh! That sounds absolutely delicious! I’m only missing a few of the ingredients, so I’ll be rectifying that when shopping tomorrow – and here comes Sunday dinner! :)

Jan says:

Stacy, if one of the ingredients you’re lacking is the tapioca flour, you can sub it with cornstarch, if you have it on hand. You can also make a bigger roast – if you have a 4 pound roast, just double the recipe for the rub (but not the bay leaves or soy sauce). If you make it, let me know how it turns out; we just love it!

Kath says:

Long, long ago I used to make the pot roast in foil recipe using the onion soup mix. I loved the ease of that recipe, but it’s probably been 25 years since I’ve used onion soup mix. Thank you for this recipe! I’m eager to give it a try.

I love pot roast. I would give ANYTHING to come home tonight to pot roast.
Sadly, I have been home about 2 of the last 48 hours.
There are no groceries in our house. There has been no decent/healthy food ….
I will get caught up NEXT week???????

Lisa says:

Sounds perfect. And BTW, that might be my favorite food photo of yours yet!

Jan says:

Thank you, Lisa – unfortunately, neither Foodgawker nor Tastespotting agreed with you. Ah, well…

[…] 10. Pot Roast In Foil This pot roast recipe uses foil to save the day, making sure that your roast won’t dry out, and locking in the flavor. It also makes for an easier clean up, so it’s a winner all around. She says that this method is best suited for a rump roast or a chuck-eye, as these cuts are typically not as tender have a tendency to dry out if they’re not cooked properly. Eating Paleo will turn you into a meat cooking pro in no time when you have experienced chefs to help you along the way. […]

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