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World’s Moistest Chicken

Yes, I know, but I couldn’t think of anything else to call it.

Which is not to say it isn’t true.  I used to be a boneless, skinless breast devotee when it came to chicken, probably because that’s all my mother ever fed us when we were growing up.  In recent years, though, I’ve come to love dark chicken meat – preferably with the bone still in it and the skin still on it.  And because dark chicken meat is also the favorite of the male members of my household, we seem to have eaten all of the thighs and legs stashed away in our freezer.  The only dark meat is a bag of wings, which I’m saving, so we are reduced to chicken breasts until our next batch of chickens arrives tonight.

I wasn’t much in the mood to cook last night, so I treated the idea to bone and skin the breasts and stuff them with something as the moment of temporary insanity that it was and decided to just roast them.  Ah, but that would be boring, and roasted chicken breasts can turn into tough, dry chicken breasts pretty easily, even when you leave the skin and bones intact.

I’d roasted an entire chicken with mayonnaise in the past, with excellent results, and decided that would work for the 3 split breasts I’d pulled out of the freezer (“split breasts” is the common term for the two halves of the breast of a chicken with the bones and skin).  The only thing I could think of that might make it better – and still keep the dish simple – was the addition of Sriracha, that red hot sauce that comes in a bottle with a rooster on it; I’ve become quite fond of mayo mixed with Sriracha of late.

If that makes me weird, then I’m happy to be weird.

At any rate, the chicken came out fantabulously – moist, tender and flavorful, with just the right kick of heat from the hot sauce.  As Guy Fieri would say, “Winner, winner, chicken dinner.”

Note:  The stated serving size for this is nine, and they will be on the smallish side.  It will serve six quite generously, but that will increase the calories to over 600 per serving.  Just so you know.

World's Moistest Chicken

World’s Moistest Chicken

5.0 from 5 reviews
World's Moistest Chicken
 
Serves: 9
Ingredients
  • 3 large split chicken breasts
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 cup mayonnaise, preferably homemade
  • 1/4 cup Sriracha hot sauce
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 F. In a small bowl, stir together the mayonnaise and Sriracha.
  2. Pat the chicken breasts dry with a paper towel and sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper. Spread the mayonnaise mixture evenly over each breast. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes, or until the chicken is golden and the juices run clear when pierced with a fork.
  3. Allow the chicken to rest for 5 minutes; cut each breast into thirds and serve.
  4. Nutrition (per serving): 447 calories, 31.6g total fat, 135.9mg cholesterol, 323.2mg sodium, 322.6mg potassium, 1.2g carbohydrates, <1g fiber, 1.1g sugar, 38g protein

 


27 comments

Be says:

It really was the most wonderfully moist breast I’ve ever had.

No, I can’t do it…I just can’t. :)

Michele says:

You might not be able to but I will…

Really? Do you want to elaborate?

Be says:

Not really. Not since I was a suckling youth was I ever very interested in moist breasts.

YUMMMMMMMMMM!! That looks and sounds awesome – and thanks for making me drool. And making me hungry. :)

Lori says:

Trying this as soon as I can find some of this Sriracha hot sauce. If I can’t find it around here can I use regular hot sauce? I’m with Stacy…this looks really yummy and is making me very hungry already. :)

Jan says:

Lori, you should be able to find Sriracha in the ethnic section of the grocery store, right by where they sell the soy sauce. It’s a bright red sauce in a plastic squeeze bottle with a picture of a rooster on it. If your store doesn’t carry it, then whatever hot sauce you have will probably work just fine. :)

Lisa says:

Brilliant! My mom used to bake sole filets under mayo, bread crumbs, and capers. Was one of my fave dishes as a child.

Jan says:

Hmmm…I hadn’t considered doing this with fish. I wish sole was easier to get in our neck of the woods. Perhaps flounder?

matt says:

Were these boneless or bone in?

Jan says:

Bone-in and skin-on. You can do it with boneless, skinless chicken breasts, but reduce the cooking time by about half.

Carol says:

I did this for years on swordfish, which tends to be dry…the mayonaise (mixed with a little crushed garlic) sealed the juices in and it was always delicious! Bubly and golden brown, on both sides.

Oh my, sounds wonderful…I have never roasted chicken with mayo before??? Not sure why…

Nancy says:

Made this tonight with boneless breasts. So tender and moist, hardly needed a knife to cut it.

Beverly says:

Darn! Now I have to go buy some chicken breasts. Got the rest of the ingredients…altho…I do have a 3 lb. turkey breast to cook so maybe I can just split that sucker in half and go from there!

Jan says:

Beverly, the recipe would work with any part of the chicken – I used breasts because that’s what I had on hand. But I think the turkey breast idea is wonderful!!

John says:

I’m not quite sure just how many “3 large split chicken breasts” is. Since breasts usually come in pairs, are you saying split 3 paired chicken breasts for a total of 6 breasts or do you mean 3 single breasts? Sorry if this question sounds snarky but I’m earnestly asking and would really like to know the answer. Thanks

Jan says:

It’s not a snarky question at all! Chicken breasts are considered – by farmers and butchers, anyway – to be a single part of a chicken, although as consumers we consider each side of the breast as a single part. So a “split” breast is one chicken breast from a consumer point of view – what you’d get if you were buying bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts.

I hope that clarifies it a little!

John says:

Ok So i’m getting 3 single breasts, correct, or am I saying it wrong?

Jan says:

Yup – 3 single, bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts. Or 2, if that suits you better. Or 4! Well, you get my drift. ;)

John says:

Thank you.

[...] any rate, the evening I made the World’s Moistest Chicken, I also roasted a sweet dumpling squash, just to use one; I had a vague idea about mashing it with [...]

Tracy Edwards says:

I have made this chicken before. It is the best. I put bread crumbs on the skin. It is solo good!!!

[…] 14. World’s Moistest Chicken You’d better be ready to back up your claim if you say you’ve got the world’s moistest chicken. There are so many things you can do to make sure that a breast of chicken comes out moist and delicious, and here they’re basically walking you through the steps for how to make it come out right. There isn’t much in the way of ingredients, but one of them might catch your eye: sriracha. This is one of the trendiest hot sauces going, and it may be one reason why this comes out so tender and juicy and tasting good. […]

[…] World’s Moistest Chicken […]

[…] World’s Moistest Chicken I can’t say for sure if this is the world moistest chicken, but it will definitely be close. Coated in mayo and baked, it is moist and very tasty. Having made this twice, I sometimes coat it with almond meal for a slight crunch. […]

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